Tuesday, October 26, 2010

The Last Days of Summer from 4-6PM in Room CCPLX216


CYPRESS COLLEGE GALLERY
Summercamp’s Project Project: Fall Residency I

Panel Conversation & Closing Reception:
non locality and the transference of space, energy and memory

Thursday, October 28, 4—6PM
Panel begins at 4:15 in Room CCPLX216

Organized by Fatima Hoang, Elonda Billera, & Janice Gomez

Carol Cheh
David P. Earle IV
Douglas Rompasky       
Christian Tedeschi
Liza Wade Green
Moderated by Tarra Stevenson


A closing panel conversation: non locality and the transference of space, energy and memory moderated by Tarra Stevenson, writer & educator will include panelists: Carol Cheh, performance art writer, David P. Earle IV, artist, writer & educator, Douglas Rompasky, nomadic computer programmer—traveling for the past two years around the world on his bicycle, Christian Tedeschi, the artist representative of the current exhibition, and Liza Wade Green, performing artist who will be at Summercamp for a residency at the end of October.

Tarra Stevenson is a language lover. She utilizes the generative device of constraintbased penning whenever possible. She creates written nonsense. Her work deals directly with the topic of creation of text and writing anxiety, specifically writing anxiety in attempting to write the female body, the “ot(her).” In utilizing purposeful and repeated grammatical and spelling errors as metaphors for the evolution of the writing process, she hopes to achieve this anxiety. It is through the creation of the text that the reader can fully appreciate the synthesis and evolution of the text, as well as that of the characters.
Writing the female body is an endeavor that as a conversation deals with its antithesis: not writing the female body; writing the female body in terms of the “other,” the male body, or the heteronormative body; or, writing the body in the language of the “other.”  In her interpretation of a woman battling an androcentric world, the textual anxiety isrepresentative of such a battle. Its circularity, its roundness, is directly opposed to a linear, male constructed writing. The language is as close to the opposite of phallocentric language as possible, in that because it is spelled and used incorrectly, and yet the meaning is still coherent, the language has attempted to be wiped of its male-ness. In subverting the language at its roots, its very basis, she is attempting to subvert its dominance and heteronormativity. The words, therefore, are themselves symbols of the male dominant culture, turned upside down by consistent inconsistencies in their use. The (revisionary) structure of the story also allows for the possibility of alternate and endless storylines, again subverting the typical linear narrative structure.
She dabbles in screenwriting as well. She and her writing partner Jenava Hudek have completed Summerʼs Eve: A Lifetime Spoof and are currently at work on their next totally outrageous project. Her most current work is a novel based on Security Mom and the constraints women place on themselves -- an American form of female-circumcision. She encourages her students to break all the rules of grammar. You can contact her via her blog Heavy Meta, thisisnotheavymetal.tumblr.com

Carol Cheh is a writer and curator based in Los Angeles. She is the founder of Another Righteous Transfer!, a blog devoted to documenting LA's performance art scene. Her curatorial projects have included You Don't Bring Me Flowers: An Evening of Re-Performances (POST, 2010) and Signals: A Video Showcase (Orange County Museum of Art, 2008). She also served as exhibition coordinator for Tubular!, a show of CSU Long Beach MFA candidates curated by Doug Harvey (Pacific Design Center, 2010) and has diverse work experience at a number of museums, including SITE Santa Fe and MOCA. Carol is currently working on her master's thesis in art history, which deals with mutated notions of authorship in the work of new media artist Ryan Trecartin.

David P. Earle is an artist, writer and educator who lives in Los Angeles. Recent projects include "Open Arms," a puppet theater / video peep show created for the "The Real Show" at Summercamp Project Project (Los Angeles) and "The Distracted Drawing Station," an interactive installation at the Armory Center for the Arts (Pasadena, CA). He is the editor of "The Open Daybook" a compilation of original artwork by three hundred and sixty five artists to be released by Mark Batty Publisher in October, and curator of an exhibition by the same name which will be hosted by Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions (Los Angeles) in January 2011.

Douglas Rompasky graduated University of Hawaii with a degree in Computer Science and immediately jumped into the work force in Honolulu—did that gig for four years or so and saved up some money.  After a while Romapsky decided it wasn't the right thing for him, quit his job and decided to travel around the world on a bike.  He spent a year in New Zealand followed by five months in South East Asia, on to Europe and finally riding from Boston to Seattle down to Los Angeles; just in time to participate in the panel.

Christian Tedeschi, one of the artists in the current exhibition, has exhibited his work extensively in the Los Angeles area. In addition to creating work, he is a co-founder of Object Orange, a community services organization in Detroit and has also organized shows with Phantom Galleries in Long Beach. Tedeschi teaches Sculpture at California State University Northridge.

Liza Wade Green is currently an artist in residence at Summercamp creating a site specific performance work to be produced next season. While completing her degree in Interdisciplinary Studies from Long Island University’s Friends World Program, Liza studied conflict resolution in Northern Ireland, worked with children in Nicaragua and Costa Rica, and developed a bi-lingual youth theatre program in Wilmington, North Carolina. In London, Liza was a member of Soho Theatre’s Young Writers Program and studied acting at the Tricycle Theatre.

Since moving to Brooklyn in 2003, Liza has worked extensively in New York’s downtown theatre community. She is a member of The Stolen Chair Theatre Company where she has collaboratively created and performed in six original works including: Kill Me Like You Mean ItKinderspielCommedia dell’ ArtemisiaThe Accidental PatriotTheatre is Dead and So Are You, and Quantum Poetics.  She has been a collaborator/performer in Phil Soltanoff’s Sit, Stand, Walk, Lie Down on Governors Island and Gemini Collision Works’ George Betaille’s Bathrobe at the Brick Theater.  Her original plays have been seen at San Francisco State University, Soho Theatre in London, and the Academy Theatre in SC.

Liza has worked as a teaching artist for Creative Arts Team, The New York Student Shakespeare Festival, and Vital Theatre Company.  She has also managed the Grants and Services department at Lower Manhattan Cultural Council where she led professional development workshops and helped to assist hundreds of New York artists and arts organizations to receive public funding.


Summercamp is a home in the neighborhood in El Sereno, Los Angeles designed and built by Al Kaelin in 1950. The homemade modern house, full of pass-throughs and secret spaces, currently functions as an artist live/work space and hosts Project Project. Founded by Fatima Hoang, Elonda Billera, and Janice Gomez, Project Project showcases exhibitions, performances, lectures, workshops, screenings and events by activating multiple parts of the property—installing works in the sloping backyard, projecting videos on the living room ceiling, and showcasing musical performances in the old goat pen.

For Fall Residency I, the eight artists, Chelsea Dean, Justin Michell, Gina Osterloh, Julie Schustack, Christian Tedeschi, Bari Ziperstein, Corinne Kamiya, and Falcon Eddy, propel this energy by building an interpretation of Summercamp’s Project Project inside the gallery; pulling from past exhibitions, honing the history of the house, and making it mobile.

*image Julie Schustack, Fruit Fly Trap, 2010. Paper, glue, plastic water bottle, ceramic,12 x 6 x 6 inches

GALLERY HOURS:
Monday - Thursday 10am - 2pm
Tuesday, Thursday 4pm - 6pm

CYPRESS COLLEGE GALLERY
9200 Valley View Street
Cypress, CA 90630-5897
714.484.7133

Gallery parking in Lot 1 or Lot 8
Parking pass available at yellow kiosk


For more information go to cypresscollegeartgallery.com

Monday, October 18, 2010

Liza Wade Green comes to Summercamp. . .






Summercamp's ProjectProject proudly hosts our first in-house residency featuring New York performing artist, Liza Wade Green.  While here, Liza will take this opportunity to start on a writing/performance project that she plans to complete and perform here at Summercamp next season.  In addition to writing, there are plans for meandering, tromping and choreographing in the backyard. There are also possibilities of Liza residing at Cypress College art gallery before participating in the panel discussion on October 28th. Stay tuned!

Monday, September 27, 2010

Housewarming around the corner!

Hand embroidered invitations by Cypress College Students Ben Aule, Ryan Butzer, Mik Calandrino, Ariane Delmendo, Luis Garcia, Maritza Garcia, Graham Husted, Min Lee, John McCarrick, Jodie Nguyen, Steve Santillan & Amy Wise
Join us this Thursday at the Cypress College Gallery from 6-8PM for the artist's reception for Fall Residency I. There will be food, fun & Falcon Eddy!

For more information and directions- check out the new website

See you there!

Sunday, September 12, 2010

Summercamp Project Project goes to College!



CYPRESS COLLEGE GALLERY




Summercamp’s Project Project: 

Fall Residency I







September 7 – October 28, 2010




Artists Reception: Thursday, September 30, 6 - 8pm




Non locality and the transference of space, energy and memory



Panel Conversation & Closing Reception: Thursday, October 28, 4-6pm

Organized by Fatima Hoang, Elonda Billera, and Janice Gomez

Chelsea Dean - Falcon Eddy - Corinne Kamiya - Justin Michell - Gina Osterloh - Julie Schustack - Christian Tedeschi - Bari Ziperstein






Bari Ziperstein
Floor plan of Summercamp Project Project located in El Sereno, CA mapped onto Cypress Gallery floor plan
Working drawing for large scale tape installation, 2010

Summercamp is a home in the neighborhood in El Sereno, Los Angeles designed and built by Al Kaelin in 1950. The homemade modern house, full of pass-throughs and secret spaces, currently functions as an artist live/work space and hosts Project Project, Founded by Fatima Hoang, Elonda Billera, and Janice Gomez, Project Project showcases exhibitions, performances, lectures, workshops, screenings and events by activating multiple parts of the property – installing works in the sloping backyard, projecting videos on the living room ceiling, and showcasing musical performances in the old goat pen.

For Fall Residency I, the eight artists, Chelsea Dean, Falcon Eddy, Corinne Kamiya, Justin Michell, Gina Osterloh, Julie Schustack, Christian Tedeschi, and Bari Ziperstein will propel this energy by building an interpretation of Summercamp’s Project Project inside the gallery; pulling from past exhibitions, honing the history of the house, and making it mobile. Dealing with the themes of home in transition, function into entropy, connectedness and resourcefulness – the on-site collaboration will be an active part of the process and a learning experience for Cypress College exhibition design students who will assist in the construction, events, and docent tours of the show.




Installed works in the gallery span from densely textured architectural photographs, a miniature kitchen in a fruit fly trap and sets inspired by pass-throughs to a large scale tape installation. Each laying the foundation for open collaborative interaction with works such as a fully functional staircase made from salvaged wood which can double as bleachers to watch Falcon Eddy’s performance. Trying to make sense of movement and memory, Corinne Kamiya will be featured in Guestroom. In Kamiya’s 1 inch = 1mm scale apartment, she creates a portable safety among the chaos of change.


A closing panel conversation: non locality and the transference of space, energy and memory moderated by Tarra Stevenson, writer and; educator will include panelists: Carol Cheh, performance art writer, David P. Earle IV, artist, writer and educator; Douglas Rompasky, nomadic computer programmer--traveling for the past two years around the world on his bicycle, Christian Tedeschi, the artist representative of the current exhibition, and Liza Wade Green, performing artist who will be at Summercamp for a residency at the end of October.





Cypress College Gallery will be open from September 7 to September 29 for the public to view the installation process and collaborations with Cypress College students culminating in a reception on Thursday, September 30 from 6 to 8pm to view the completed project. The completed project will be on view from September 30 – October 28, 2010.








GALLERY HOURS:
Monday - Thursday 10am - 2pm
Tuesday, Thursday 4pm - 6pm

CYPRESS COLLEGE GALLERY
9200 Valley View Street
Cypress, CA 90630-5897
714.484.7133
cypresscollege.edu

Gallery parking in Lot 1 or Lot 8
Parking pass available at yellow kiosk


Thursday, August 26, 2010

1920s Field Day: Obsessed with Parasols to Boot

Hector Oviedo in Guestroom.

Rochelle Botello's Dreamboat floating down the hill.
Watercolor by Aragna Ker
Finding tigers in El Sereno...
The lay of the land.

Images from Paul Pescador's photographic series 3119 Chadwick.
New works by Kris Chatterson. Courtesy of Western Project.
Shifting in and out of focus, Jamison Carter's Specter.
Meriel Stern and friends amongst the nipples.
Matt MacFarland continuing the Lost Artworks series.
On to the next one.
A breath of fresh air courtesy of Laurie Sumiye's OxyTree.



View from the bottom of the hill. Nancy Popp getting ready to roll and unwind.
Audience watch from Meriel Stern's crocheted Womans Work  while Nancy Popp catches air.
Laurie Sumiye's OxyTree provides fresh green oxygen (and some much needed shade) 24/7.
Thank you Dan and Kate for providing transportable shade! A special thanks to Yuki for photographing the day's festivities.    


Wednesday, August 11, 2010

Obsessive Obsession Obsessed


Summercamp's Project Project presents Obsession Obsessive Obsessed, an outdoor group exhibition of artists who either through material, compulsion, process or concept are consumed, fixated, or possessed.
Organized by Fatima Hoang, Elonda Billera & Janice Gomez. 
 

Opening reception Sunday, August 22nd from 5—8 pm
Exhibition runs from August 22—September 3. Hours by appointment

Paul Pescador is an artist and artist organizer. His actions, gestures and performances deal with issues surrounding social disconnection and communal space. For Obsession Obsessive Obsessed, Pescador will display photographs of created pairings between seemingly unrelated objects in the private spaces of Summercamp’s Project Project.  Aragna Ker blurs individual identity through experiential consumptions to create a digestive process that expels objective matter to be inspected, avoided or re-consumed by the audience. Subliminal bells gently prompt viewers to dig through the layered depth of intuition; thus, cultivating space for onlooker to become participator. Public presentation of this work creates its own virtual hybrid of culture and globalism.

In another installment of The Lost Artworks, Matt MacFarland will create comic drawings to document his experiences at the opening. The Lost Artworks, MacFarland’s ongoing project, adheres to a structure that suggests a serial production without the series.  Any medium can be employed in the Lost Artworks.  Video can be next to a sculpture made of dryer lint, drawings next to a wall painting resembling a stain.  The potential meaning of each part of the installation, similar to how words are structured in a sentence, is contingent on the piece next to it.  Rochelle Botello’s Dreamboat is fueled by her experiences, both real and imagined. Botello uses cardboard, paper, tape and fabric to create absurd scenarios that engage issues of identity, desire, and control thereby exposing the complex and contradictory nature of everyday life.  Meriel Stern  is transforming the topography of Summercamp’s Project Project by crocheting a covering blanket for the land out of clothesline and a path of round crocheted galvanized steel wire and silicone nipples.
 

Through constructed membranes, Jamison Carter explores the existence of spirit(s), phantoms, thoughts and things that have no physical form. Carter’s precarious linear structures attempt to give form to the physically undefined while remaining tenuous in their construction and defined by their negative space.  Kris Chatterson paints to explore abstract possibilities within self-prescribed limitations. The limitations serve as a conceptual framework to keep his process focused. Each painting begins with a series of structural marks that provide an armature for the looser marks. After being convinced of his motives, the resulting marks become passing thoughts in paint and time.

The OxyTree® is an indoor-outdoor installation by artist Laurie Sumiye that asks the viewer to imagine a near-future where clean air is a premium, and trees are sold and marketed as “all-natural air filters.” The work considers how obsessively buying green products blurs the reality of sustainability and science, and how our belief systems and cultural habits shape what we perceive our own health and well-being is related to the environment.  Nancy Popp’s projects investigate the body’s relationship to site and architecture, along with the risk and vulnerability of serious play.  For Obsession Obsessive Obsessed, Popp will invite audience participation and utilize the slope of backyard hill.

And as a compliment to Obsession Obsessive Obsessed, Hector Oviedo will be featured in Guestroom.  Oviedo’s drawings, often religious in nature, use a dense vivid color palette and extensive patterning suggestive of a rapturous experience.  Oviedo creates and shows his work at First Street Gallery Art Center, an exhibition resource and arts management center for adults with developmental disabilities in Claremont, California.

Monday, June 28, 2010

Really? Yes, Really.

. . . and now, a few images from -
The Real Show (title pending)


In Goatspace: Somersault by Xu DaRocha
 Photographs by Sean Dungan

Untiitled #1 by Sean Dungan

Untitled Sculpture #2 & #3 by Carly Steward 

Open Arms organized by David P. Earle

Open Arms
Videos by Karen Lofgren and Miwa Matreyek

Untitled (designation pending) by Sergio Torres-Torres

Summer Prop by Jill Newman


Pretty Vacant IV by Steven Bankhead







Aireoke with Master of Airemonies, Björn Türoque!
Photo by Kristy Baltezore

Photo by Kristy Baltezore

Photo by Jean-Paul Bondy

Photo by Jean-Paul Bondy

Photo by Jean-Paul Bondy


Photo by Jean-Paul Bondy






Photo by Jean-Paul Bondy

Photo by Jean-Paul Bondy

Sunday, June 6, 2010

Summer is here! Can you feel the heat?!?


The Real Show (title pending) 

Steven Bankhead   Xu DaRocha
Sean Dungan   Jill Newman   Carly Steward
Sergio Torres-Torres
Open Arms with Karen Lofgren & Miwa Matreyek**

June 13-27th, 2010 by appointment 
Opening Reception Sunday June 13th  5-8 pm. 

Aireoke hosted by Björn Türoque 7:30- 9:30pm

Organized by Fatima Hoang, Elonda Billera & Janice Gomez.  
**Organized by David P. Earle


Summercamp's Project Project presents, The Real Show (title pending) an outdoor group exhibition of artists who push the parameters of realism and expand its definition.  Xu DaRocha’s folded fabric oil paintings embody the juxtaposition of superficial casualness and emotional complexity. DaRocha confronts and celebrates the chaos and the order within the name of beauty, often spending hours, even days, folding fabrics and working on the detailed creases and wrinkles before starting the paintings, so that the images will carry the negotiations and the tensions between the sense of reality and emotional fragments.  While working at the Gardner Museum in Boston, Sean Dungan photographed the inside of the museum at night.  Dungan’s grid of four photographs are dark, quiet and may be boundary-destabilizing.  Carly Steward also uses photography to investigate topics such as exhibition design, display, installation, sculpture, and abstraction. With each photograph, or sculpture constructed, Steward aims to reflect a specific architectural detail within the space that is being displayed. The photographic sculptures use texture and space to enable the viewer to acknowledge his/her body. By creating a structure for the photograph to be displayed on rather than hanging it on the wall the viewer becomes more aware of the photograph as an object.  For The Real Show (title pending), Steward will display three 13 by 19” framed photographs on pedestal bases with the intention that during the duration of the show, the images will fade and change with elements revealing the ethereal nature of photography in contrast to the sculptural material. 

Engaged in the social and political impact of architecture and appropriated sites, Jill Newman explores improvised structures that exist somewhere between architecture and prop. By removing their original context and rendering these constructions fantastical and romanticized, Newman both celebrates and historicizes these subjects, shifting the image from a document to a signifier of self-sufficiency and resourceful ingenuity.  Pushing the symbolic potential of these pictures further, Newman recently began focusing on the relationship between abstraction and meaning by using flags and embellishments from these structures as points of formal departure for non-representational painting and sculpture.  Sergio Torres-Torres’s practice is based on an interdisciplinary approach determined by the conceptual, historical and material necessities of the project. For The Real Show (title pending), Torres-Torres has crafted a landmark sign overlooking the hills of El Sereno to find a balance between content and form.  Also interested in the openness of the urban vista, Steven Bankhead’s bench will allow for a contemplation of

“No things, no bombs, no stock market, no riots, no remakes, no isms, no cars, no oil, no development, no school loans, no commute, no jobs, no romantics, no recessions, no wars, no culture, no subculture, no pollution, no plastic, no bullshit, no assholes, no dicks, no time, no age, no guchi, no money, no modern, no blockbusters, no bosses, no disease, no corporations, no politics, no problems, no bills, no hunger, no nothing, no torious B.I.G…”

Karen Lofgren and Miwa Matreyek will be featured in Open Arms.  An art space delineated in tattoo ink on the forearms of two Johns, John Barlog and John Burtle—Open Arms consists of two 2" x 4" plots of skin that have hosted drawings, petite paintings, mini-sculptures, micro-performances. For The Real Show (title pending), David P. Earle was invited to organize a project in Open Arms.

Dan Crane is a journalist, author, musician, and competitive air-guitarist. He is the author of “To Air is Human: One Man’s Quest to Become the World’s Greatest Air Guitarist” (Riverhead Books, 2006), and the co-star of the award-winning documentary, Air Guitar Nation.  In 2004, Crane gave up his career as an educational software producer to pursue his dream of becoming the world’s best air guitarist. Under the nom d’air Björn Türoque (pronounced to-RAWK), he competed in numerous competitions, repeatedly coming in second place. He retired in 2005 and now emcees air guitar competitions around the world and will be hosting Aireoke (the air guitar equivalent to karaoke).  It is an exciting venture to have air guitar leave the bright lights of the stage and find a home in the intimacy of  The Livingroom.



Summercamp's Project Project   3119 Chadwick Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90032

Sunday, April 25, 2010

Go Big or Go Home!

Congratulations to the new Los Angeles Air Guitar Champion, our very own Janice Gomez-Hoang:ROCKS, the aka Bride of Rock!! Thanks to Shinichi Ono for this fabulous photo, and thanks to all of the people who caught her when she trust fell from the balcony! Go Big or Go Home- as they say...

On to Nationals!
-Elonda

Tuesday, February 23, 2010

The grass is greener on the other side of this magaizine cover

We were reminiscing about the days of summer when foxtails cut your heel and figs fell into your mouth. Oh, those days! But alas, we forgot to share our lovely pic from the November/December issue of Artillery magazine (killer text on art, you know). We were fortunate to have both Tulsa Kinney and Anne Martens meander the yard and guestroom during the Big Ass show. We struck a few poses for the camera but thankfully Will Long's work and Al Kaelin's creation (the casa) made the cut. Check out the article on page 22 with an image of Jason Manley's work to boot! If you can't find the magazine, let us know-- maybe you can come over and read it.

Looking out the window, the grass is lush, the foxtails are dormant, and the fig tree is bare. Oh, and the picnic table is still at the bottom of the hill. Any volunteers to help drag it up? We have till May(be).

 
Thanks for the photo Anne Martens!